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Archive for the ‘Presentations’ Category

#BLAle14 Tuning out the white noise in library communication

14 Jul

A lot of the communication between Libraries and academic departments is just white noise, unless we tailor and personalise it. This takes a large amount of time, but the returns you get are absolutely huge – and this is the basis of my #BLAle14 keynote, a version of which is here:
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For context, here’s the Twitter back-channel during the presentation – divided into sections so you can read along with the slides if you’re especially keen. There’s more on the conference itself below the Storify.

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The BLA

I became a Business Librarian this year, when I took over looking after the York Management School alongside my other departments in January. I also took over our membership of the Business Librarians Association and have been looking forward to the BLA Annual Conference, which everyone told me was excellent. And it was! I had a great time, it was great to catch up with old friends and make new ones, and I very much appreciate Nathan and the organisers inviting me to speak. As I said in my talk, I’ve found the BLA to be an extremely useful and helpful organisation to be a part of, so if anyone reading this looks after a Business School but isn’t a member, I’d recommend signing up.

I was only able to attend two days of the conference but for me the highlights included:

  • The National Space Centre where we were lucky enough to experience a Key Stage 2 film all about The Stars and that in the Planet-arium
  • Very nice accomodation as part of the conference venue which made everything extremely easy – it’s much more relaxing never having to worry about travelling from a hotel etc, so other conference organisers take note
  • A very interesting presentation about The Hive in Worcester – the UK’s first joint public and academic library, from Stephanie Allen. I have to admit it never even occured to me that a public-academic library was possible, but although it sounds complicated Stephanie made a pretty convicing case for it being a great idea. It sounds like a great place – generally I have no interest in Libraries as places but I’d quite like to visit The Hive…
  • Joanne Farmer showing us Northampton’s very nicely done video on employability (which she scripted)
  • Andy Priestner‘s very engaging talk about how UX in Libraries is very much a thing now – here’s Andy’s presentation on Slideshare, take a look
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I was sad to miss Aidan Smith’s presentation on Occupye, used at Birbeck to show where there is seating free in the Library – this won the best short paper prize.

I thought the organisers did a great job, and it was the first conference I’d been to since LIASA so it felt great to be at that kind of event again. Thanks for having me!

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Twitter tips for improvers

10 Jun

Here’s a new set of slides I’ve just uploaded to my Library’s slideshare account:

 

I think the key to good feedback in a workshop is probably 10% about the content, 10% about the delivery, and 80% about whether it is pitched at the level the participants expect and require. That’s probably an exaggeration but you get my point. I’ve blogged on here before about how I run sessions around Web 2.0 and academia for the Researcher Development Team at York, and in the last couple I’ve really felt for a small number of participants who were at a stage beyond the level I was pitching at. The workshops are introductions so participants literally set up, for example, a Twitter account from scratch – so anyone who is already past that point but wants to know about content and tone, is doing far too much thumb-twiddling for my liking, until later in the session.

With all that in mind, as of next academic year we’re reworking the workshops, and in each case I’ll run one ‘A beginner’s guide to’ type session and one ‘Improvers’ type session, so people can get exactly what they need out of the workshops. We didn’t have time to arrange that for this terms’ workshops, so I produced the slides above to send on to participants of my introductory workshop, for those who wanted to go further. In January when the next set of workshops run (I don’t do any in the Autumn term, because AUTUMN TERM), I’ll flesh this out into a proper interactive 1.5 hour session.

Have I left anything important out? One of the things I love about Slideshare is that you can update and reupload slides over the same URL, so you don’t lose that continuity (and your statistics). So if there’s anything you’d add to this, let me know in a comment, and I can eventually make a new and improved version to put online in place of this one.

My advice to Tweeters: ignore advice to Tweeters…

If there is a slide in the deck above that could be considered in some way controversial, it’s this one:

 Slide 16 from http://www.slideshare.net/UniofYorkLibrary/twitter-for-improvers

I think guides for tweeting well are most important for organisations – it’s key that companies, businesses and public bodies get this stuff right, and they often don’t. For individuals though, I’m increasingly of the mind that unless you specifically want Twitter to DO something for you which it currently isn’t doing (and the slides above are aimed at researchers who specifically want to grow their network in order to find more value in it), it’s not worth reading ‘how to tweet’ guides (of the kind I used to write myself) and trying to change how you approach it. There’s plenty of good advice to be had in these, but it’s not necessary to follow any of it – apart from not being unpleasant or otherwise making people bad about themselves. If you want to tweet about your lunch every day, why should you stop doing that just to retain followers? I think it’s better to be yourself and have a group of followers who are prepared to put with that, for better or for worse…

Number of followers isn’t an end in itself. A smaller group of engaged followers who want to interact with YOU is far better than a huge group for whom you have to put on any kind of show. So while when writing in print it’s important to adopt a style appropriate for the medium, I consider Twitter to be much closer to spoken communication. As long as you’re prepared to deal with the consequences, why not just be yourself?

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Can you use Twitter for Academic teaching? Yes, here are some examples

17 Feb

I have read, and contributed to, an awful lot of writing online about Twitter in HE. Social networks in general and Twitter in particular are increasingly accepted as a valuable part of the academic world. If you want to know about how to use Twitter for communication, for building reputation, for research, then Google will provide you with endless hours of reading.

However, using Twitter in teaching seems to be far more tricky and ambiguous. There are a lot more people asking ‘Can we use Twitter in academic teaching, and if so, how?’ then answering that question. Interestingly, there’s a lot more info out there in using it in the school classroom than on using it in the University seminar room, lab, or lecture theatre.

With that in mind, and to make the most of a real edtech zietgeist happening at the University of York at the moment, I put together a 1.5 hour workshop for academics, as part of a series I’m doing for the Learning & Teaching Forum. I really enjoyed putting this together because I learnt a lot, and spoke to a lot of academics doing really interesting things with tweets.

The biggest issue in this area seems to be that you can’t make students sign up for the platform, so how do you make sure no one is excluded if you’re providing key info via Twitter (without you having to duplicate everything)? The first answer is embedding a Twitter stream in the VLE – there is a full guide on how to do that (with BlackBoard) in the handout which accompanied the session (embedded below). The second answer is projecting a hashtag onto the walls during teaching. Chemistry at York is, for some reason, always at the front of the curve with social media, and one of the things Simon Lancaster does is have a back-channel running on big screens during lab-sessions, using Tweetbeam, so that students who don’t wish to sign up for Twitter can still get the benefit of seeing other students’ tweets (and also pictures shared by Simon). I really liked this idea – I liked the ceding of control, the high risk of it, and I like the fact that the students don’t abuse the trust, and take the opportunity instead to contribute enthusiastically and productively.

Anyhow, here are the slides from the workshop – I hope if you’re reading this you find them useful. If you’re an academic and want to chip in via the comments with how you utilise Twitter, that would be great; if you’re an information professional and you also run these sorts of workshops, I’d love to hear from you too.

 

 

Using Twitter in Academic Teaching by University of York Information

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The key to good marketing is to promote one thing at a time

05 Dec

If you’ve got a great idea, don’t dilute it. Simplicity results in better traction for your idea. You need to give people one idea at a time, so they can grab onto it, digest it, and see how it relates to them. Not only that, but the simpler the idea, the more likely it is for people to share and pass it on.

Think about the really successful online writers, like Seth Godin. He’s made a career out of taking single concepts, focusing on them one at a time, and getting a bajillion hits to his blog as a result. Once people buy into his one-key-thing-at-a-time approach to ideas, they’re then more likely to buy into him as a concept, and push his (more complex) books up the best-seller charts.

So, keeping things simple isn’t dumbing down. It’s providing people with an easy way-in. That’s just good marketing. Much of marketing is to simply get people in the door – THEN you can give them a whole variety of reasons to say inside.

Most of the readers of this blog work in the information profession, like I do. This means we have a complex sell. Library services are myriad, but your promotion must be in bite-sized chunks. Libraries are complicated, but your marketing must not be. The secret to good communication is to market one thing at a time.

Here’s an example of a poster promoting a library. In theory, it ought to be good. It looks okay, uses a nice font. But more importantly, it tells you about all sorts of amazing library services! What’s not to like? How you can resist this?

On all of these, click the pics to view them on Flickr

But actually, this poster doesn’t work. There’s too much going on, it does not provide an easy way in. You’re relying on people grabbing on to the part that relates to them, and then taking an action (coming to the Library) because of it – in most cases, that’s too big a leap of faith. You’re much better off dividing that list up into individual posters, and putting them in the most relevant areas for their specific target groups. So for example this message, even though it’s only one useful thing instead of many useful things, is a much more powerful piece of marketing:

Then you make ANOTHER poster to cover another aspect of the original:

Or you can take multiple concepts but tie them together into one easily-digestible, relate-able, shareable package:

Finally, if you really want to put several library services into the same piece of promotion, you can do this and STILL have the one simple message for people to take away. In the example below, you’re saying to people that the library is a welcoming place, that they can come in and use the wifi and enjoy the cafe, without being judged for not using the books and journals. But you’re also listing all the other things they MIGHT do if they so desire. As I said above, much of marketing is to simply get people in the door – then you can give them a whole variety of reasons to say inside.

So remember, keep it simple. Market one thing at a time. It WILL yield tangible results.

(All of these posters are available on my Flickr account via an Attribution Creative Commons licence. Note that it’s NOT a ‘no-derivs’ or ‘non-commercial’ license – in other words if you can find a use for these ideas, but want to change and adapt them to your own purposes, feel free to do so.)

 

 

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