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the blogging lifecycle

19 Mar
Graphic showing the lifecycle of good and bad blogging

May contain exaggeration

:)

- thewikiman

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Comments
  • Ned Potter March 19, 2010 at 2:45 PM

    Some Friday afternoon fun for ya'll – the blogging lifecycle: http://bit.ly/9UCzfR :)

  • Bobbi Newman March 19, 2010 at 5:39 PM

    the blogging lifecycle http://bit.ly/9pSnbI

  • ? Stephen Ransom September 16, 2010 at 1:47 PM

    "Blogging: When it works and when it doesn't" http://bit.ly/9UCzfR Not the only 2 perspectives, but still makes a valuable point.

  • Lisa Nielsen September 16, 2010 at 1:58 PM

    Thx @ransomtech for sharing "Blogging: When it works and when it doesn't" http://bit.ly/9UCzfR – powerful graphic. Just commented on post.

  • Jon F. Orech September 16, 2010 at 2:09 PM

    RT @InnovativeEdu: Thx @ransomtech for sharing "Blogging: When it works and when it doesn't" http://bit.ly/9UCzfR – powerful graphic.

  • Lisa Nielsen September 16, 2010 at 2:57 PM

    Thank you for sharing (creating?) this great graphic. It does a fantastic job of conveying a point I discuss often with innovative educators who decide that “all their students will have blogs.” No! Blogging can’t be forced upon someone. It comes from passion, inspiration, knowing a message that you want to share…not a message your teacher is making you write about.

    What I advise instead, is that educators help students find blogs, newspapers, magazines, etc. that cover topics they are passionate about. Read them. Get ideas. Form opinions. Comment. Maybe submit a guest post to a real “not contrived” audience. Join the web 2.0 conversation and develop your eyes, ears, and voice.

    If a student wants to start a blog, great, but if you mandate it, you take away the inspiration necessary to make it succeed and leave your students “muttering darkly about is it worth it all.”

  • thewikiman September 16, 2010 at 3:02 PM

    Hey Lisa, thanks for commenting! I certainly did create that graphic – it was actually meant to refer to invidual posts by an individual blogger (ie when it works for me, and when I force it) but it could be interpreted as you have done, applying to blogging per se. I like it.

    I’m a great advocate of blogging for people in my field (Information Professional / Librarianship) as a way to connect with a community and get a feel for the wider profession’s goings on. But as you say, it can’t be forced on anyone and shouldn’t be. People have to find the medium of expression that works for them.

    (Feel free to use the graphic, with attribution, should you ever wish to! :) )

  • theREALwikiman September 16, 2010 at 3:28 PM

    Sudden flurry of interest in old ‘the blogging lifecycle’ post / graphic due to @ransomtech tweeting a link to it.. (http://thewikiman.org/blog/?p=560)

  • Ned Potter September 16, 2010 at 3:28 PM

    Sudden flurry of interest in old 'the blogging lifecycle' post / graphic due to @ransomtech tweeting a link to it.. (http://bit.ly/9UCzfR)

  • theREALwikiman September 16, 2010 at 3:37 PM

    @ransomtech Yeah it’s weird – some of my posts get a lot of comment, but that one had not a jot till today! Thanks for tweeting, anyway..

  • ransomtech September 16, 2010 at 3:34 PM

    @theREALwikiman Funny how that happens, isn’t it. Sometimes audience needs help finding what’s out there.

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